By T. Alan Hall

This research investigates the phonological habit of coronal consonants, i.e. sounds produced with the end or blade of the tongue. The research attracts on facts from over a hundred and twenty languages and dialects. A definition of coronality is proposed that rejects the present view maintaining that palatals are certainly marked for this option. The characteristic [coronal] is thought to be privative; the normal classification of noncoronals is captured with the characteristic [peripheral], which dominates [labial] and [velar] in function geometry. The publication incorporates a special exam of the phonological patterning of segments belonging to every of the six coronal subplaces (i.e. interdental, dental, alveolar, retroflex, palatoalveolar, and alveolopalatal). A common set of beneficial properties is posited that debts for those proof. Inventories of coronal consonants are taken care of extensive and most unlikely contrasts are accounted for with a number of if-then statements. the current research additionally features a long research of the phonology of rhotic consonants. a collection of good points is postulated which captures common periods related to rhotics and nonrhotic consonants and which distinguishes a number of the stricture kinds between rhotics (i.e. trill vs. faucet vs. approximant).

Show description

Read Online or Download The Phonology of Coronals PDF

Best language & grammar books

Basic Concepts and Models for Interpreter and Translator Training: Revised edition (Benjamins Translation Library)

Simple innovations and versions for Interpreter and Translator education is a systematically corrected, more suitable and up to date avatar of a publication (1995) that is prevalent in T & I education programmes all over the world and extensively quoted within the foreign Translation stories group. It presents readers with the conceptual bases required to appreciate either the rules and recurrent matters and problems in expert translation and reading, guiding them alongside from an advent to basic communique concerns in translation to a dialogue of the usefulness of study approximately Translation, t.

The Phonology of Coronals

This research investigates the phonological habit of coronal consonants, i. e. sounds produced with the top or blade of the tongue. The research attracts on information from over one hundred twenty languages and dialects. A definition of coronality is proposed that rejects the present view maintaining that palatals are absolutely marked for this option.

Deutsche Sprachlehre Fur Ausländer Grundstufe

Deutsche Sprachlehre fur Auslander, Grundstufe in einem band [Paperback]

Extra resources for The Phonology of Coronals

Example text

Paradis & Prunet 1989 discuss this question with respect to Fula. Similar considerations are made by Marotta (1993) for Latin). This is a question that must obviously remain open, but it brings up another important point. Since the feature specifications posited in the preceding paragraphs (and in the remaining chapters) are intended to be universal, to what extent can individual languages deviate from these structures in being underspecified for some feature? The general difficulty can be illustrated with the following example.

Palatal fricatives pattern phonologically with noncoronals like velars and palatalized velars, which are both [+dorsal]. What my analysis therefore allows is natural classes like the ones in (21): The feature [-back] in (21) and below is understood to represent the tongue fronting that characterizes palatalized and palatal segments. 20 In the system I propose in §2 below the palatals , the alveolopalatals , and the palatoalveolars ([/, 3]) are [-back]. In contrast, velars are [+dorsal] and [+back], and alveolars and labials are not marked for either backness or dorsality.

Of the two possibilities, only (ii) is a serious alternative to the binary approach in (1). The reason (i) does not work is that there are languages with rules and/or constraints referring to nonstrident sounds to the exclusion of strident ones. g. the, that, they, them, there). e. [-strident], (or, alternatively [mellow], as in (ii) above). g. e. [-strident] and ^stri­ dent], or alternatively, [strident] and [mellow]). 4, the same generalization can be made concerning [+anterior] and [-anterior].

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.47 of 5 – based on 24 votes