By Rivka Nir

The "Syriac Apocalypse of Baruch" is a pseudepigraphic apocalyptic paintings ascribed to Baruch son of Neriah, the scribe of Jeremiah. This paintings makes an attempt to teach that the interior constitution and significant rules of II Baruch has to be understood in a Christian context.

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5:3: “and in the middle the tree of life, in the place where the Lord rests whenever He comes to the Garden of Eden”; Apoc. Mos. ” E. A. W. Budge, The Book of the Cave of Treasures, 60. Ezek 28:13–14 already connects the garden of Eden with the holy mountain of God, and depicts the restoration of the earthly Jerusalem using images of the garden of Eden; cf. ” 143. On the lack of clarity regarding the location of the garden of Eden, see Gil, “Studies in the Book of Enoch,” 180. B. 13:8–9; 26:6. God showed Adam the place of the creation and color alongside the garden of Eden.

8; m. 6–9. , Midr. 17, composed in the eleventh century. See Zunz, Ha-Derashot be-Yisra’el, 144–45; Even-Shmuel, Midrashei Ge’ulah, 19–22. 66 Jerusalem, which the visionary sees brought down from heaven by God and shining with a brilliant, pure light, is the temple. 67 “And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine upon it, for the glory of God is its light, and its lamp is the Lamb” (Rev 21:23); the sun and the moon, the luminaries of the original creation (Gen 1:14), have no place in the second creation, in which Christ and his church are the sun and the moon.

41a; b. Bes[ah 5b; b. Ros\. Has \. 30a; etc. Cf. G. Alon, Toldot ha-Yehudim be-)Eretz Yisra)el be-tequfat ha-Mishnah 26 PART ONE: THE HEAVENLY JERUSALEM Unlike the development of a belief in the existence of a heavenly temple, there is no image of a heavenly Jerusalem in the early Jewish sources. The eschatological expectations of the Jewish people, as expressed in Scripture, give expression to the hope for the restoration of the temple, the return of the scattered ones of Israel, and the transformation of Jerusalem as a magnet for all nations; these were the three components of national hopes in Israel, all of which were connected with the historical Jerusalem.

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