By Géza G. Xeravits

The current monograph specializes in the advance of the complicated last component of the booklet of Baruch (4:5-5:9) and investigates this passage in a variety of features, equivalent to constitution, biblical historical past, culture heritage, and its formative concerns.

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Additional resources for "Take Courage, O Jerusalem…": Studies in the Psalms of Baruch 4–5

Sample text

R u`ma/j meta. pe,nqouj kai. j u`ma/j meta. carmosu,nhj kai. n para. tou/ qeou/ u`mw/n swthri,an h] evpeleu,setai u`mi/n meta. do,xhj mega,lhj kai. lampro,thtoj tou/ aivwni,ou This strophe—and the second greater unit of the psalm—begins with the imperative form qarsei/te, which seems to be the main structuring element of the two psalms in Baruch 4:5–5:6. The strophe consists of three parts: the first (4:21) is an address with justification; the second (4:22) is the expression of Jerusalem’s confidence; while the third part (4:23–24) is a prophecy of liberation.

In this perspective it is significant that at verse 8b he sets Jerusalem on the stage as the one grieved by Israel (lupe,w). This is the first instance where attention is directed to the Holy City, the protagonist of the main body of the psalm. ), an incomplete sentence, the function of which is to introduce the following material. The construction of this unit is interesting. On the one hand, several terms attach its material to the previous text of the strophe. The word ovrgh, echoes the verb parorgi,zw from verse 6, the complement para.

Although the second colon of verse 19 relates the consequence of the childrens’ departure, it seems to be most safe to consider it as part of the following, interestingly shaped unity of two bicola. The core of this text is certainly the bicolon of verse 20ab. n th/j eivrh,nhj vs. sa,kkon th/j deh,sew,j). The genitive parts of the constructions depict two opposing attitudes of Jerusalem, that of safe rest and that of supplication during troubles. evkdu,w stolh, eivrh,nh ↨ evndu,w ↓ sa,kkoj ↨ de,hsij  8 A group of manuscripts reads in verse 17 the verbal form du,namai instead of the adjectival dunath,.

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