By David Kraemer

The life of anguish poses an seen challenge for the monotheistic religions. Why does an omnipotent, benevolent God let people to undergo? And provided that God does, what's the applicable human reaction? nowa days Jewish theologians specifically, confronted with the enormity of the Holocaust, have struggled to come back to grips with those concerns. In Responses to soreness, David Kraemer deals the 1st complete historical past of teachings concerning soreness in classical rabbinic literature. starting with the Mishnah (c. two hundred CE), Kraemer examines traditions on ache, divine justice, nationwide disaster, etc, in all significant rabbinic works of overdue antiquity. Bringing to endure fresh equipment within the background of religions, literary feedback, canonical feedback, and the sociology of faith, Kraemer deals a wealthy research of the improvement of attitudes which are relevant to and stay modern issues of any spiritual society.

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Responses to Suffering in Classical Rabbinic Literature

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2:10-19) The stories as a whole are explained on the basis of the same cycle (see, for example, 3:7, 4:1, 6:1, 8:33). The sin throughout is idolatry, and the punishment is the suffering experienced through defeat. The narratives of these books commonly suggest the same explanation. For example, the deposition of Saul is explained at 1 Sam. 15 as punishment for his refusal to obey the ban of Amalek. Similarly, it is on account of his sin with Bathsheva that David is threatened with death and other calamities.

So, too, would the destruction of what was left of the kingdom in the south be punishment for the sins of Menasseh (chapter 21). 9 In general terms, the classical prophets also explain suffering by means of this cause (sin) and effect (punishment = suffering) relationship. This connection may be found in a wide variety of places, too numerous to list here (representative examples may be found at Isa. 3:16-26, 5:24-29; Ezek. 3:17-21,39:23). Perhaps its most important expression, because of the insistence that each individual is punished for his or her own sins, is the detailed treatise on divine justice in Ezek.

And they were in great distress. Then the Lord raised up chieftains who delivered them from those who plundered them. But they did not heed their chieftains either; they went astray after other gods. . They were quick to turn aside. . When the Lord raised up chieftains for them, the Lord would be with the chieftain and save them from their enemies. . But when the chieftain died, they would again act basely. (Judge. 2:10-19) The stories as a whole are explained on the basis of the same cycle (see, for example, 3:7, 4:1, 6:1, 8:33).

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