By LiDonnici, L.R., Lieber, A., Lynn LiDonnici, Andrea Lieber

This quantity brings jointly quite a lot of overseas students of historical Judaism, whose essays discover a number of matters surrounding Jewish groups and Jewish id in overdue antiquity. The essays are geared up into 3 sections: examining Ritual Texts, Mapping Diaspora Identities, and Rewriting culture.

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Extra info for Heavenly Tablets: Interpretation, Identity and Tradition in Ancient Judaism (Supplements to the Journal for the Study of Judaism)

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As a result of the loss of seeds and plants, the land became unproÀtable as the people ate too much fruit and food in the current seasons (11:12–13). Abram soon began to identify the errors of the earth: “that everyone was going astray after the statues and after impurity” (11:16a). These events provide the context of the next prayer. (3) First Prayer of Abraham [11:17] At age fourteen, Abram separated from his father to avoid falling into idol worship with him (11:16), and “he began to pray [ yeÉalli] to the creator of all that he would save him from the errors of mankind and that it might not fall to his share to go astray after impurity and wickedness” (11:17).

21a). The aspect of complaint, however, is quite muted in this prayer. This prayer reminds us of the scene with Moses at Mount Sinai, so worried about his people that he prays to God for them (cf. Exod 32:11–14 and Deut 9:25–29). 16 We can proÀt from a synoptic view of that text in Deuteronomy with this prayer of Moses. Jubilees 1:19–21 (19) [Then Moses fell prostrate and prayed [wa-Éallaya] and said: “Lord, my God, do not allow your people and your heritage to go Deuteronomy 9:25–29 [NRSV] 25 Throughout the forty days and forty nights that I lay prostrate before the LORD when the LORD intended to destroy you, 26 I prayed to the LORD and said, “Lord GOD, do not destroy the people who are your very own 16 Klaus Berger, Das Buch der Jubiläen ( JSHRZ, II: Unterweisung in erzählender Form; Gütersloh: Gütersloher Verlagshaus Gerd Mohn, 1981), 317.

Deuteronomy 6:8 and 11:18 both report the requirement to bind God’s commandments on the hands and forehead. ] hand”). ”19 The injunction, however, as we see when we compare the 19 I am grateful to Shani Berrin of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem for drawing my attention to this passage. 22 benjamin g. wright iii Deuteronomy passage, seems to assume the same practice—placing something on the hands and the forehead as a sign. The commands in Exodus differ from each other in small but important details.

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