By Leanne Lieberman

Ellie Gold is an orthodox Jewish youngster residing in Toronto within the past due eighties. Ellie has no doubts approximately her strict spiritual upbringing until eventually she falls in love with one other lady at her grandmother's cottage. acutely aware that homosexuality clashes with Jewish observance, Ellie feels pressured to both regulate her sexuality or go away her group. in the meantime, Ellie's mom, Chana, turns into confident she has a messianic function to play, and her sister, Neshama, chafes opposed to the limitations of her religion. Ellie is afraid there isn't any strategy to be either homosexual and Jewish, yet her mom and sister supply substitute techniques of God that support Ellie discover a position for herself as a queer Jew.

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And when we left, he laughed, it couldn’t happen to him. But a few weeks later all the Jewish people left in Nordhausen were sent to concentration camp. He was three months in Buchenwald, too, not quite three months. So we got him a ticket to overseas, we helped with getting that. He came right with the next ship, I think. We wanted my mother to come before, and she said, she is not going before all her kids are out, that means my younger brother in Nordhausen. Then it was too late for her. She couldn’t get out, you know.

My husband was no danger, he was a very quiet man, you know, no danger. It took me about a week till I knew where he was. I had no idea that something like that could happen. I called my boss, Dr. Schleisner, in Hannover. And he was nice enough to come to Berlin where I was, but he couldn’t do anything, he just explained to me how the situation was, you know, he couldn’t do anything. My husband was very neat and very clean. When he wasn’t shaved, he wasn’t dressed, okay, that was impossible for him.

Papa had left earlier. But we saw him under good terms. It just wasn’t enough to stay together, I guess. It happens. By then it was ’38, and I had been thinking about emigrating and we had written to relatives in the States, distant, distant relatives, who didn’t really care very much. They had loudspeakers in Berlin. Not everybody had a radio in those days, and they had loudspeakers, I guess, to get a better listening rate for Hitler’s speeches, or for whatever propaganda was coming through there.

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